Brassicas

Brassicas

Cabbages and leafed vegetables are all members of the family known as Brassicas. These plants are typically grown for their leaves and their flowering parts and often feature throughout cooking dishes around the world. This group provides more variety than any other genus of vegetables.

  • Plant & Growing Tips:

    Members of the Brassica do well when planted in a sunny position.

    Brassica members are cool season vegetables.

    Brassicas are considered rather easy and adaptable plants which grow well over a wide range of soils from light sand to heavier clays. Avoid waterlogged soils.

    The best yields have been achieved from those that are grown in soils with high organic matter.

    To avoid soil-borne diseases, plant sites should be rotated annually.

    Keep young plants well watered until properly established. Brassicas that are grown in beds will require more watering than those grown on the flat.

    Keep free of weeds in order to encourage strong root growth.

  • Fertiliser Applications:

    "Light Sandy Soils"

    Stage: Seed Bed

    Product: Dinofert Organic Fertiliser, Dinofert Standard Pellets

    Gardener Use: 2½-3½ cup (500-700g)/m²

    Commercial Use: 5 - 7kg/10m row

    Comments: Broadcast and mix with soil or band directly below where seedlings are to be planted. This is to be done 7 days before planting. Most Brassica crops are now planted from container grown seedlings.

     

    Stage: Side Dress

    Product: Dinofert Organic Fertiliser, Dinofert Standard Pellets

    Gardener Use: 1½ cups (300g)/m²

    Commercial Use: 2.5 - 3.5kg/10m row

    Comments: Apply as first side dressing about 2-3 weeks after field planting. Apply 2 side dressings at 3-4 week intervals following first side dressing. Broccoli and Brussel sprouts may require extra applications.

     

    "Red Clay Loams"

    Stage: Seed Bed

    Product: Dinofert Organic Fertiliser, Dinofert Standard Pellets

    Gardener Use: ¾ cup (150g)/m²

    Commercial Use: 1.1-2.1kg/10m row

    Comments: Drill along intended row position about a week or two before transplanting. Do not broadcast as these soils fix large amounts of phosphorous (ie. it is converted to forms unavailable for plant uptake).

     

    Stage: Side Dress

    Product: Dinofert Organic Fertiliser, Dinofert Standard Pellets

    Gardener Use: ½-¾ cup (100-150g)/m²

    Commercial Use: 1.4-2.0kg/10m row

    Comments: Apply as first side dressing about 2-3 weeks after field planting. Apply two side dressings at 3-4 week intervals following first side dressing. Broccoli and Brussel sprouts may require extra applications.

     

    "Heavy Textured & Alluvial Soils"

    Stage: Seed Bed

    Product: Dinofert Organic Fertiliser, Dinofert Standard Pellets

    Gardener Use: ¾ - 1 cup (150-200g)/m²

    Commercial Use: 1.5-2.2kg/10m row

    Comments: Broadcast along the intended row position and incorporate about a week before transplanting. If fertiliser is band placed, reduce rates by 50%. Fertiliser should be placed in bands 3 – 5cm wide, at a depth of 1.3cm below the seed.

     

    Stage: Side Dress   

    Product: Dinofert Organic Fertiliser, Dinofert Standard Pellets

    Gardener Use: ½-¾ cup (100-150g)/m²

    Commercial Use: 1.5kg/10m row

    Comments: Apply 2-3 side dressings at 3-4 week intervals. In the heavier soils, two side dressings only may be needed. The first 3-4 weeks after sowing and the second, at the start of heading or hearting. 

Disclaimer

Please note that the above information and recommendations are provided in good faith and are given without liability for loss or damage suffered as a result of their application. Optimum response to fertilisers will only be achieved when weeds, insect pests and diseases are controlled and adequate soil water is available.

Fertiliser use recommendations are presented as a practical guide to good agronomic practice under most situations. Local soil, climatic and other conditions should also be taken into account as these could affect plant response to fertiliser rates and applications.

For further information we recommend you seek advice from your local agronomist.